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Bush Explorers Encyclopaedia

Baroque Spur
 - Baroque Spur

Is located on the western side of Deep Pass 1.3km south, south west of Deep Pass.Cliff lined on two sides, it contains the most intricate delicate erosion sculptures, incuding a window. So named by Michael Keats on a Bush Club walk, 24th August 2012. Michael chose the name, Baroque Spur, as the rocky features reminded him of the lavish architectural and artistic style of the baroque period.

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Barton Creek *
 - Barton Creek

Is a non perennial stream rising at McLeans Pass and Mount Jamison. It flows generally east by north for about 10km into the Wolgan River.

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Barton Glen
 - Barton Glen

Is located above the cliff line 1.5km north north west of the Wolgan Road and Emirates intersection. This glen is about 450m long having a flat base of about 50m wide. Either side great rows of pagodas have concealed slots and are encrusted with epiphytes.

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Barton Pass
 - Barton Pass

Is a natural inclined ramp that gives access from the base of the first cliff line to the top of the southern point, Chimera Point, and plateau which overlooks the Wolgan Valley, Donkey Mountain and the property, Penrose below. Named by Brian Fox on a Bush Club walk, 24th March 2016.

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Barton Slot
 - Barton Slot

Is located above the cliff line 1.5km north west of the Wolgan Road and Emirates intersection. This slot the about 200m long. In places it is 70m deep and varies in width from 50cm to 2m. Having a general gradient of 30 degrees except where a drop of 6m would entail a rope descent. Named on a Bush Club walk 28th August 2015 by Brian Fox, Yuri Bolotin and Michael Keats as it is located on one of the tributary creeks of Barton Creek.

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Beagle Head
 - Beagle Head

Is located 400m south east from the locked gate off Wolgan River Trail at Newnes. But with an elevation difference of 280m. This huge undercut part of the top cliff face jutting out over the Wolgan when viewed from the north east resembled the head of a Beagle dog. Named by Brian Fox on a bush walk 28th July 2014.

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Beecroft Firetrail
 - Beecroft Firetrail

Is a NPWS signed track about 8km long. It commences in Masons Lane north of Lidsdale at GR 296 045 and tracks generally east to join the Blackfellows Hand Trail close to the headwaters of the Wolgan River, GR 358 026. Beecroft Firetrail was from 1876 a shortcut for drovers moving their cattle and sheep from Bell to Ben Bullen via Gardiners Gap. Ref: Brown, Jim. Bent Backs, 1989, pp. 275-276. Henry Beecroft (1852-1935) first held a Conditional Purchase, 29th January 1876, then in 20th February 1881, 69ac. Later purchased Portion 100, Parish of Lidsdale, 40ac in1903; Portion 101, 84ac in 1908. Ref: Survey Plan 936.1507 and Certificate of Title Vol. 1560, Fol. 154. The land was passed down jointly to his son, Norman Edley Searl Beecroft (1894-1982), and in 1937 to another son Joseph GeorgeBeecroft (1878-1953) and his wife Annie May Beecroft (1876-1962) who held it until 1954. Joseph George Beecroft also held two Conditional Purchases at Mount Cameron from 1903-1947. Ref: Survey Plan C2098 and 2099.1507.

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Beecroft Trig Station *
 - Beecroft Trig Station

Was constructed by the Royal Australian Survey Corps in 1930. Ref: Lands Department Bathurst Trig Summary Cards. It is located at the elevation of 1025m on the southern side of Beecroft Firetrail, 2.5km north north east of Lidsdale.

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Bell *
 - Bell

Is the locality on the north west extremity of the Grose Valley where the Darling Causeway joins Bells Line of Road. The railway station was originally named as Mount Wilson in May 1875 as it was here that travellers got off the train to continue their journey by horse and buggy to Mount Wilson. The name was changed to Bell Railway Station on the 1st May 1889, so named after Archibald Bell. The locality also taking on this name by default.There was a surveyed but unformed street in Newnes named Bell Street as well as seven families with the surname, Bell, appearing on the electoral roll as living in Newnes between 1906 -1922.

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Bell Miner Canyon
 - Bell Miner Canyon

See Minotaur Lair

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Bells Grotto
 - Bells Grotto

A beautiful Tree Fern filled grotto, is part of Tunnel Creek and is located on the southern side of the Glowworm Tunnel. This grotto by passes the tunnel. It was also referred to as Penrose Gorge. Eardley, G H. and Stephens, E M. The Shale Railways of NSW, 1974, p. 136, record, "The more hardy adventurous passengers left the train during the watering operation and walked the narrow footpath through the beautiful Bells Grotto." Ref: Deane, Henry. The Wolgan Valley Railway - Its Construction, 1910, reproduced by the Australian Railway Historical Society, 1979, p. 13, shows a map with Bells Grotto.

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Bells Line of Road

Archibald Bell made a successful attempt of finding a passage from the Hawkesbury River to the Coxs River in September 1823. Surveyor Robert Hoddle was dispatched by Surveyor General John Oxley to survey this line just one month later, in October 1823. The name was referred to as Bell's Road, Ref: Government Notice, The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, 4th June 1829, p. 3. However, later the name was known as Bells Line of Road, Ref: Land sale advertisement in The Sydney Monitor, 18th June 1838, p. 3. The Lithgow Topo Map shows two sections of the Old Bells Line of Road. From Clarence to the junction of Glowworm Tunnel Road, and a small section of named road from Bungleboori Camping Ground in what is now known as Blackfellows Hand Trail. This was so named as it was part of Robert Hoddle's survey of Bell's Line, even though Archibald Bell did not traverse this area.

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Ben Bullen *
 - Ben Bullen

Is a village located about 9km north of Cullen Bullen and 21km north by west of Wallerawang. Its boundaries are within the Lithgow Council administrative area. On John Lang's second visit across the Blue Mountains in 1834, he recorded stopping at the property,Ben Bullen, owned by Thomas Cadell, J. P., who with his family had arrived from Sydney in 1832. Ref: Lang, John Dunmore. An Historical and Statistical Account of New South Wales, 1875, pp. 218-221. The Sydney Gazette, 3rd August 1844, p. 3, records a boiling down establishment for the production of tallow from sheep at Ben Bullen. The NSW Geographical Names Board records Ben Bullen as an Aboriginal derived word. Two meanings have been given: high, quiet place and Lyrebird. Endacott, Sydney J. Australian Aboriginal Words and Place Names, 1961, p. 11.

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Ben Bullen Creek *
 - Ben Bullen Creek

Is a watercourse rising about 3km west of Wolgan Gap Trig Station. It flows generally north north west for about 6.5km into Jews Creek.

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Ben Bullen Pillars
 - Ben Bullen Pillars

Are two very special prominent pagodas which can be seen from the Wolgan Road when passing through Angus Place. Both are subject to underground coal mining and one has a massive 45 degree split through it. Name given to them by Michael Keats and Brian Fox on a Bush Club walk, 21st December 2011.

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