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Ben Bullen *
 - Ben Bullen

Is a village located about 9km north of Cullen Bullen and 21km north by west of Wallerawang. Its boundaries are within the Lithgow Council administrative area. On John Lang's second visit across the Blue Mountains in 1834, he recorded stopping at the property,Ben Bullen, owned by Thomas Cadell, J. P., who with his family had arrived from Sydney in 1832. Ref: Lang, John Dunmore. An Historical and Statistical Account of New South Wales, 1875, pp. 218-221. The Sydney Gazette, 3rd August 1844, p. 3, records a boiling down establishment for the production of tallow from sheep at Ben Bullen. The NSW Geographical Names Board records Ben Bullen as an Aboriginal derived word. Two meanings have been given: high, quiet place and Lyrebird. Endacott, Sydney J. Australian Aboriginal Words and Place Names, 1961, p. 11.

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Ben Bullen Creek *
 - Ben Bullen Creek

Is a watercourse rising about 3km west of Wolgan Gap Trig Station. It flows generally north north west for about 6.5km into Jews Creek.

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Ben Bullen Pillars
 - Ben Bullen Pillars

Are two very special prominent pagodas which can be seen from the Wolgan Road when passing through Angus Place. Both are subject to underground coal mining and one has a massive 45 degree split through it. Name given to them by Michael Keats and Brian Fox on a Bush Club walk, 21st December 2011.

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Ben Bullen Railway Station *
 - Ben Bullen Railway Station

Opened on 15th May 1882 and closed on 1st June 1974. The Ben Bullen public school opened in January 1878 and closed in December 1949. Ben Bullen Post Office opened 1st November 1889, closed 6th March 1965.

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Ben Bullen Range *
 - Ben Bullen Range

Extends from the Great Dividing Range, 2.6km south west of Gardiners Gap. It trends generally north west for about 5km and finishes about 1km south east of Kirbys Hill. It was first shown on the Survey Plan 58.14996, dated 5th October 1853.

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Ben Bullen State Forest *
 - Ben Bullen State Forest

Is located in the Bathurst Forestry District. It has an area of approximately 19,220 acres (7,778ha). Ben Bullen State Forest was dedicated on 20th May 1938.

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Benbys Pinch *

Is a steep section of the old road way on the south side of the Wolgan River about 1km east of the Village of Newnes. Earliest map reference, Surveyor Edgar Harris on his survey of Wolgan River, October 1890. Ref: Survey Plan Misc. 111. Oe. R. One possible origin of the name is in recognition of William Benby. He arrived in Sydney from Brisbane on the steam ship Governor Blackall on 2nd June 1882. Another plausible suggestion is that the name was originally spelt incorrectly and that instead of Benbys it should have been Bendys Pinch as this pinch of land (tight constriction) is located where the Wolgan River takes a right hand turn from generally flowing south to north to west to east. This common descriptive name also fits with the common generic name of the named pinch further downstream, Devils Pinch.

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Big Bell

Is a large bell shaped pagoda near the end of Point Cameron. Named by Dr Haydn Washington. Ref: Correspondence with Haydn Washington, 30th May 2010.

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Big Foot Canyon

Was discovered by Ted Hartley on a Kameruka Bushwalking Club trip in 1977. It is located on the southern side of Island Mountain and accessed via Zobels Gully and Telephone Pass. It is a moderate grade three canyon with deep wades but no swims. It discharges into Deanes Creek.

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Bindu
 - Bindu

Is an overhang on the upper reaches of Kangaroo Corner Creek on the property Glastonbell. It is an old camping/ picnic site with old billies and mugs. GR withheld due to it being on private property.

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Binnings Gap

Described by Surveyor, Joseph Carne, c. 1901, “as a well worn track that leads to a pass through the lower cliff line at a break to the right of the main gully.” Andy Macqueen, Wayfaring in Wollemi. pp 33-34 plus map reports, “The pass is steep and exposed. Above the pass the track appears to sidle for 140m until it intersects with the creek. It continues up the left hand side for 300m. The section from the creek to the small gully, although overgrown, was once laboriously benched and cleared of boulders and rocks.”

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Binnings Hole
 - Binnings Hole

Is to be found at the junction of Annie Rowan Creek and the Wolgan River. It is first shown on Carne, Joseph. Geological Map of the Capertee and Wolgan Valleys, 1901. Carne, Joseph. Geology and Mineral Resources of the Western Coalfield,1908, p. 95. Alexander Binning (c1810-1863), a stonemason by trade, was a sub-inspector in charge of convicts working on Victoria Pass in the 1830s; he constructed Glasgow Arms Inn at Bowenfels and designed St Bernard's Church, Hartley, c1843. Ref: Cuneo, William Rev. Hunters of God, 1979, p. 26. Morgan, MacLeod. A short history of the Wolgan Valley, 1959. Jenkins, Yvonne. Bowenfels, 2008, p. 28. Survey Plan 491.691. Plan of 2 Portions applied for to purchase (Bowenfels), dated 1838. Alexander Binning also constructed Eskbank House, Bennett Street, Lithgow, in 1842, for Thomas Brown. This building is now a museum. It is most likely that Binnings Hole was named by Thomas Brown who had a selection of 80 to 90 acres there prior to 1899. Ref: Bathurst Free Press and Mining Journal, 28th April 1899, p. 3. Also see Rowans Hole, for geological description of the term 'Hole'.

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Binnings Hole Neck

Is a 230m high basalt hill named by Joseph Carne, 27 October 1904, In his ‘Geology and Mineral Resources of the Western Coalfield, 1908,’ Carne writes “on south bank of Wolgan River, within the channel gorge. Apex at foot of southern escarpment of Hawkesbury Sandstone cliffs, extending thence to the river bank as a narrow, steeply falling ridge. Contacts well developed. Small channel down western slope exposing excellent sections of tuffs and agglomerates, GR 539 237. Ridge formed of olivine basalt. Patch of Coal Measure shales caught up in centre”.

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Birds Cave No. 2
 - Birds Cave No. 2

See Birds Caves

Refer to 3 caves along Birds Rock Creek. GR 402 083. The first and most significant is approximately 18m wide, 12m deep and 6m high with flat foor. The other two caves are located at GR 409 086, dimensions 25m wide, 10m deep and 10m high and at GR 410 086 a cave that is about 30m long and is effectively a two storey cave. It is proposed to name these caves Birds Caves after brothers James and Richard Bird. It is their names which was given to Bird Rock Trig. Station. Named by Yuri Bolotin and Michael Keats on a Bush Club walk 27th December 2013.

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Birds Caves
 - Birds Caves

Refers to three caves along Birds Rock Creek. GR 402 083. The first and most significant is approximately 18m wide, 12m deep and 6m high with flat foor. The other two caves are located at GR 409 086, dimensions 25m wide, 10m deep and 10m high and at GR 410 086 a cave that is about 30m long and is effectively a two storey cave. It is proposed to name these caves Birds Caves after brothers James and Richard Bird. It is their names which was given to Bird Rock Trig. Station. Named by Yuri Bolotin and Michael Keats on a Bush Club walk 27th December 2013.

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Dry Canyon in the Gardens of Stone